The biomechanical short term effect of upper thoracic spinal manipulation techniques on restricted vertebral mobility, controlled by dynamic rasterstereography. | The International Academy of Osteopathy IAO
 

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The biomechanical short term effect of upper thoracic spinal manipulation techniques on restricted vertebral mobility, controlled by dynamic rasterstereography.

2019/11/20

Author: Bogaerts Niels
Supervisor: Luyten Michiel

Background: There is a high prevalence of thoracic back complaints, 1 out of 5 women and 1 out of 10 men will experience it. Despite this high prevalence, research about this region is rather limited, compared to cervical and lumbar investigations. The varying biomechanics and the influence of the different surrounding tissues in this region lead to a limited or non-existing consensus in literature. Until that consensus is found, it is difficult to determine the possible causes, the diagnosis and potential treatments of mechanical related complaints at the level of the thoracic vertebral column.

Goal: The goal of this study was to check if the range of motion (ROM) and symmetry improvement is visible after manipulation of the first five thoracic vertebrae.  

Material and methods: The data were captured with a DIERS formetric 4D motion device. This measures the segmental mobility in three dimensions using rasterstereography. The 88 test subjects experienced a pre and post measurement while walking. The control group underwent a placebo technique, the intervention group received one to several manipulations in the area between the first and the fifth thoracic vertebra. Data was processed through a MANOVA analysis in SPSS.

Results: The Wilks Lambda test showed a limited number of significant values in favour of the control group. This group would show an improvement where the experimental group shows a loss of ROM.

Conclusion: This research shows no significant biomechanical changes are found in favour of the experimental group, measured through rasterstereography, immediately after a manipulation technique at the level of the first five thoracic vertebrae.

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