The effects of using manual techniques on the diaphragm compared to breathing exercises on the Forced Vital Capacity: a randomized experimental study. | The International Academy of Osteopathy IAO
 

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The effects of using manual techniques on the diaphragm compared to breathing exercises on the Forced Vital Capacity: a randomized experimental study.

20/11/2019

Author: Judith Smits
Supervisor: Carmen de Paepe

Background: There is an increasing number of people who suffer from stress, hyperventilation, who have a dysfunctional breathing pattern or pulmonary complaints. Various studies point to hypertonia of the diaphragm in these pathologies. Diaphragm dysfunction is an often-underestimated cause of respiratory problems. Any dysfunction of the diaphragm or other accessory respiratory muscle issues influences the lung ventilation.

Objective: The aim of this study is to compare an osteopathic approach with a traditional treatment, by measuring the forced vital capacity (FVC), to determine if osteopathy can add value to the future treatment of lung complaints and / or breathing
difficulties.  

Material and methods: Subjects were randomly divided into two groups, an intervention group and a control group, each group consisting of 23 healthy subjects.  The intervention group received six different manual technique, based on a
mechanical, neurological, and vascular approach of the diaphragm.  The control group received three different breathing exercises. The FVC value is measured before and after treatment, using the Spirobank II advanced plus device.

Results: Within-group comparison revealed that there was a significant difference in FVC value (P-value = 0,0001) in the intervention group, while no significant difference (P-value = 0,7089) could be determined in the control group. A comparison between the groups did not reveal a significant difference (P-value = 0,3175) in FVC value.

Conclusion: This study confirms treating the diaphragm adds value to the treatment of lung problems and / or breathing difficulties.

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